The Artisans

Scapa is crafted by a small team of 5 dedicated artisans and a Master Distiller, using traditional methods perfected over generations. One of the last remaining manually operated distilleries, manned 24 hours a day. Our crew work in successive shifts which means each shoulders the honour of delivering a consistently smooth, creamy sweet single malt on his own. Trust is a word they do not take lightly.

Brian THE CAPTAIN

Our Master Distiller grew up as an Islander determined to follow his dream of working either by the sea or in a distillery. Combining his two great passions, he is now the guardian of our artisanal Orcadian single malt whisky. His father and grandfather were distillery men, so you could say it’s not just a calling, it’s a family tradition.

Mick THE HOST

A native Orcadian, Mick wants his home to be known for its hospitality. One day when doing a spot check of the still house, he stumbled on a rogue tourist taking photos. These were the days before Scapa had a visitor centre and passionate fans had to find their own way in. Mick didn’t mind, he took a break and gave the man a tour.

Bryan The Airman

Bryan’s been with us since 2004 when he left the Royal Air Force. A military man, Bryan’s favourite Scapa story has to do with the Royal Navy in World War I. Naval officers were billeted in the distillery when a fire broke out. Admiral Jellicoe, commander of the Grand Fleet, sent men ashore to put the fire out, building a human chain to carry the water and saving the distillery from destruction.

Jon The Champ

Jon is an Orcadian, and the youngest member of the team. His other distinguishing achievement is being junior champion of The Ba’. A Christmas Day sporting event that claims the entire capital city as its pitch, the Ba’ is an Orkney tradition that sees two teams, the Uppies and Doonies, wrestle a leather ball either doon (down) into the sea or up to an inland goal. The scrum can reach up to 350 men.

Jeck The Friendly Face

Orcadian through and through, Jeck is never without a smile or a helping hand for his fellow artisans. He loves living in a place where there are no traffic lights and people still leave their doors unlocked. He’s been known to joke, “I don’t think the locksmith in Orkney makes a particularly good living.”

Loading...